Loading…
This event has ended. Visit the official site or create your own event on Sched.

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Thursday, October 17
 

8:30am EDT

Breakfast
Light breakfast with assorted pastries and fruits.

Thursday October 17, 2019 8:30am - 9:30am EDT
Main Ballroom

8:30am EDT

Registration
Stop by the registration table at the entrance to check-in, collect your name badge and additional information about the day!


Thursday October 17, 2019 8:30am - 9:30am EDT
Main Ballroom

9:30am EDT

Welcome
Speakers
avatar for Allan Gyorke

Allan Gyorke

Chief Academic Technology Officer, Academic Technologies, Academic Technologies


Thursday October 17, 2019 9:30am - 9:45am EDT
Main Ballroom

9:45am EDT

Keynote: Learning Fast and Slow
Nobel Prize-winning psychologist and economist Daniel Kahneman coined the term “slow thinking” to call attention to the deliberative, conscious, and self-aware thinking that, he argued, leads to more rational, thoughtful, and comprehensive decisions. The stakes are high:  locally and globally, we face civic, climatological, economic, and individual stressors that many view as existential threats. So, how do we, as teachers develop that essential capacity in our students, a capacity that will allow them to make ethical and civic-minded use of the content we teach them? Our challenges are considerable: we teach in a range of disciplines, with a range of outcomes demanded by accreditation, job placement, metrics for institutional success, and political headwinds that have made higher education more sensitive to public disapprobation. Our students, arguably, come to us relatively unskilled in slow thinking: accustomed to digital modalities, gamification, and visual stimulation, many of them are also unacculturated to the conventions of the academy, and studies have shown that reading is in decline across all institutions of higher education. I’d like to put this challenge in context. I also want to ask how we might intervene, collectively, as colleagues with a common mission, especially those of us who work at residential research universities.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa MacFarlane

Lisa MacFarlane

Professor of English and American Studies, University of New Hampshire


Thursday October 17, 2019 9:45am - 10:15am EDT
Main Ballroom

10:30am EDT

Table 01: Teaching Students How to Teach: UM Graduate School’s Teaching Academy
The Graduate School’s Teaching Academy is helping to prepare UM graduate students and post-doctoral fellows for careers that require teaching excellence. Through close collaboration with educational experts at the university, this applied program is delivered in six sessions to a multi-disciplinary group of fellows across a full semester. This Learning Circle will describe the program, objectives and preliminary outcomes, and will provide an opportunity for participants to exchange ideas and promote teacher training at UM.

Speakers
avatar for Tatiana Perrino

Tatiana Perrino

Associate Dean of the Graduate School and Associate Professor, Department of Public Health Sciences



Thursday October 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Main Ballroom

10:30am EDT

Table 02: One Book, One U: Using This Year’s Common Read
Join us for a discussion of the One Book One U program and learn about this year’s selection, Brother, I’m Dying, by Edwidge Danticat. Facilitators Roxane Pickens and Meghan Homer will share options for integrating the book’s topics and themes into the curriculum and request feedback from faculty on how the book could be useful in promoting a shared experience at UM.

Speakers
avatar for Meghan Homer

Meghan Homer

Assistant Director, Center for the Humanities
avatar for Ava Brillat

Ava Brillat

Learning & Research Services Librarian, University of Miami Libraries



Thursday October 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Main Ballroom

10:30am EDT

Table 03: Dancing Glass: Reflections of Art through Dance
Dancing Glass: Reflections of Art through Dance was sponsored through a CREATE grant from the Mellon Foundation. Thirty undergraduate students enrolled in a beginning dance improvisation class used the glass art collection from the Lowe Art Museum for inspiration in original dance compositions. Innovative teaching methods focused on the use of dance and movement, visual thinking strategies, personal reflection, group collaborations, an artistic collaboration with musicians, and staging dance in an art museum. Additionally, students participated in a pilot study on creativity and self-concept. A video documentary of the creative process will be shown during the round table discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Carol Kaminsky

Carol Kaminsky

Senior Lecturer, Dance Program, Frost School of Music
avatar for Jorge Morejón

Jorge Morejón

Lecturer, Dance Program, Frost School of Music



Thursday October 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Main Ballroom

10:30am EDT

Table 04: Developing a Global Mindset with a 360 Virtual Reality Tour Assignment using Google's Tour Creator
This session will discuss the development and piloting of a 360 Virtual Reality Tour Assignment using Google's Tour Creator application.  The Assignment was originally piloted in a STEM English Composition class within the College of Arts and Sciences but has potential applications for other subject areas interested in developing students' global mindset and cultural capital. The assignment invites students to create and guide an audience through a step-by-step virtual ‘tour’ of their favorite public space to visit (locally, nationally, or internationally).  This requires students to research the culture and history of the selected location and develop a digital story-line using 360 images and writing tailored to the needs of a peer audience.  Students added audio narration and sounds to accompany the images and descriptions and peer evaluated at least two tours. By watching and evaluating each other’s virtual tours, students learned about each other's cultural backgrounds and benefited from the opportunity to share their own cultural history with their peers.  For instance, several students chose to showcase historic sites from their home countries, ranging from China, Nepal, Peru, and the U.S.  Additionally, this exercise challenges students to think strategically about the relationship between media, text, Virtual Reality in story-telling, within a global context. Students wrote a two-page reflective paper about the strategic choices they made in constructing their tour, from selecting their site, to guiding the peer and public viewer through multiple points within the tour, to engaging and sustaining reader/viewer interest from beginning to end. While it's important to ensure 360 images of the selected location are available, the assignment has promising applications to facilitate students' development of logical reasoning and coherence in story-telling, cultural intelligence, written and digital rhetoric, and specially encourages them to develop or enhance a global mindset. 

Speakers
avatar for Larissa Ramos

Larissa Ramos

Full-Time Lecturer, Management, Miami Business School


Thursday October 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Main Ballroom

10:30am EDT

Table 05: Applying Design Problems through NASA Design Competitions within Undergraduate Engineering
This session will focus on sharing the transformation of a course project as a result of the 2019 Faculty Learning Community on ‘3D Printing and Maker Technologies.’ During Fall 2018, a new course project structured around the NASA Robotic Mining Competition and  NASA Human Rover Competition was introduced to provide over 40 students with authentic hands-on experience to design and demonstrate mechanical systems. The NASA competitions are design-based challenges for university-level students to design and build 1) a mining robot that can traverse the challenging simulated chaotic off-world terrain or 2) a vehicle designed to traverse the simulated surface of another world. Student teams designed and 3D printed a system in addition to submitting an initial proposal, a midterm-report and a final presentation and report. Each project was connected to an engineering student organization – UMaker and ASME who consulted on the project designs. This session will share the major course changes, and  discuss the opportunities and challenges this course redesign offered students.

Speakers
avatar for Emrah Celik

Emrah Celik

Assistant Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering



Thursday October 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Main Ballroom

10:30am EDT

Table 06: Sustainability in the Curriculum: Creating Opportunities for Students to Engage with UN Sustainable Development Goals
Introduced in 2018, ‘Sustainability in the Curriculum’ is a faculty-led institutional initiative and community that provides guidance to develop a new course or a course module that incorporates sustainability or environmental issues appropriate to your field. This initiative is guided by a collection of UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including issues around poverty, inequality, climate, environmental degradation, prosperity, and peace and justice.  By addressing SDGs and targeting specific learning outcome(s) within your courses, students will have the opportunity to search for, apply and achieve a Sustainability Certificate administered by the Ecosystem Science and Policy (ECS) program. During this session, we will 1) discuss with faculty ways they can explore and address a collection of global goals within their courses, 2) share curriculum resources from organizations and academic institutions, 3) identify university resources and student organizations that engage students in sustainable development opportunities.

Speakers
avatar for Gina Maranto

Gina Maranto

Senior Lecturer, Co-Director and Graduate Program Coordinator, College of Arts and Sciences
avatar for Teddy Lhoutellier

Teddy Lhoutellier

Manager, Sustainability



Thursday October 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Main Ballroom

10:30am EDT

Table 07: Profile of a Writer: Archival Research & Rhetorical Analysis
ENG105 students in groups of 4-5  researched and analyzed an archived writer’s collected works housed at the Kislak Center - Special Collections Library Archives here at the University of Miami.  Groups selected a few artifacts from their assigned archive which they felt represented rhetorical choices of the writer - analyzed these artifacts rhetorically - and presented their evidence using theoretical principles as a frame.  In their analyses, groups gave a clear account of how their chosen artifacts provided proof that the writing was shaped by the writer’s choices and constraints as they “made-meaning” in the context of history, politics, culture, etc. of their time.  Groups delivered their final reports as multi-modal submissions and presentations.

Speakers
avatar for Jay Sylvestre

Jay Sylvestre

Special Collections Librarian, Special Collections, University of Miami Libraries
avatar for Leslie McCutchen

Leslie McCutchen

Lecturer, English Composition, College of Arts and Sciences



Thursday October 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Main Ballroom

10:30am EDT

Table 08: ‘Design Dialogues’ - A Mixed Reality Exhibit of Architecture’s Role as a Conduit for Social and Political Agency
This learning circle will focus on sharing a work-in-progress from this year’s Faculty Learning Community on ‘Augmented Reality and Spatial Computing.’  Within a Fall 2019 architecture studio course ‘Porch Portrayals,’ upper-level students conducted extensive research on porch sites located in Miami to create a mixed-media and Magic Leap installation ‘Design Dialogues’ at School of Architecture’s Korach Gallery. The 'porch' is one of the most recognizable symbols in the history of the traditional American home. From historic shotgun homes in New Orleans to bungalow homes in Chicago, the porch has been a key space of congregation for many demographics. To investigate the porch and its role as a collective gathering space, students researched structures through compiling and creating images, drawings, analytical diagrams, 3D models, narratives, and a physically fabricated model. This learning circle will therefore share insight into experimental pedagogies, where students imagine new architectural realities based on existing research and site data.

Speakers
avatar for Germane Barnes

Germane Barnes

Assistant Professor, School of Architecture



Thursday October 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Main Ballroom

10:30am EDT

Table 09: 'Biomedical 'Active' Activities: Introduction to Design Thinking and Human Centered Design in the Biomedical Freshman Year
The Department of Biomedical Engineering has its main design course sequence starting in the second semester of the student’s junior year with a biomedical design course, followed by the capstone project during the student’s senior year. This presentation will focus on sharing how I used problem-based learning in the biomedical design course. In this course I introduced the Bio-design method along with instruction on human centered design (HCD) using the LUMA Design thinking tools.  LUMA is a framework for human-centered design. I created a sequence of hands-on activities to introduce HCD using the LUMA Design Thinking tools with the purpose of enabling the students to work in teams and build a device to solve an unmet medical need using a given technology. I will also highlight some of the challenges and successes with implementing this method of teaching.

Speakers
avatar for Jorge Bohorquez

Jorge Bohorquez

Associate Professor in Practice, Vice Chair of Academics, Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering


Thursday October 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Main Ballroom

10:30am EDT

Table 10: Using Legal Communication and Research Skills in an Exchange for Change
I will share my experiences working with UM Law students to teach Legal Writing and Analysis to incarcerated individuals at Dade Correctional Institution. In partnership with HOPE and Exchange for Change, a non-profit that brings educational courses to incarcerated individuals, I, along with UM Law students, teach persuasive writing and analysis to “inside” students. The UM Law students facilitate portions of the sessions and work side by side with their inside counterparts collaborating on their written and oral advocacy projects. This experiential learning opportunity is breaking down barriers and stereotypes through the exchange of ideas and connections by bringing legal education to a population most impacted by our justice system and at the same time, honing the lawyering skills of our own law students.

Speakers
avatar for Shara Kobetz Pelz

Shara Kobetz Pelz

Professor of Legal Writing & Lecturer in Law, School of Law



Thursday October 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Main Ballroom

10:30am EDT

Table 11: Dwell: A Table-top Poverty Simulation Game
In this learning circle, we will showcase a newly developed table-top simulation game, ‘Dwell’ designed in collaboration with the School of Nursing and Health Studies and School of Communication at the University of Miami. This interactive simulation game aims to immerse learners in a simulated community called Dwellville as one of five characters. Each of the five characters have detailed back stories, as well as short term and longer-term goals that each are trying to achieve. Learners navigate Dwellville as their character during a simulated one-month time frame working to achieve their prescribed long and short term goals. Presenters will talk through gameplay, describe the characters, game components, uses for the game, and discuss implementation for educational purposes.

Speakers
avatar for Jill S Sanko

Jill S Sanko

Assistant Professor, School of Nursing and Health Studies
avatar for Deborah Salani

Deborah Salani

Associate Professor of Clinical, Director of the Accelerated BSN Program, Nursing, School of Nursing and Health Studies
avatar for Lien Tran

Lien Tran

Assistant Professor, Interactive Media, School of Communication



Thursday October 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Main Ballroom

12:00pm EDT

Lunch
Join us for networking with our delicious taco bar!


Thursday October 17, 2019 12:00pm - 12:45pm EDT
West Ballroom Donna E. Shalala Student Center, 1330 Miller Drive, Coral Gables, FL, USA

12:45pm EDT

Learning through Dialogue and Discussion at the University of Miami
In 2018, as part of its 10-year regional accreditation renewal, the University of Miami enacted its new Quality Enhancement Plan: Learning through Dialogue and Discussion. Acknowledging that research indicates that student-to-student dialogue promotes active learning, socialization, and knowledge construction, the QEP promotes the incorporation of Harkness, flipped classroom, and problem-based teaching strategies in undergraduate courses.

In this featured breakout session, William S. Green, Senior Vice Provost and Dean of Undergraduate Education, will discuss the University of Miami’s quality enhancement efforts pertaining to discussion-based learning and relate his own experiences co-teaching Sacred Spaces, an interdisciplinary, discussion-based course with Religious Studies and Architecture students.

Speakers
avatar for William Green

William Green

Sr. Vice Provost, Dean of Undergraduate Education


Thursday October 17, 2019 12:45pm - 1:30pm EDT
East Ballroom Donna E. Shalala Student Center, 1330 Miller Drive, Coral Gables, FL, USA

12:45pm EDT

Magic Leap in the Classroom
This session will highlight how University of Miami faculty are exploring the application of Magic Leap within undergraduate and graduate courses. This session invites speakers at different stages of their experimentation with spatial computing to share their experiences, including representatives from the School of Architecture, College of Engineering, and School of Nursing and Health Studies. A series of three 10 minute presentations / demonstrations will shape this session, with time for Q&A.


12:45 - 1:00PM
Greta Valentinova Mitzova-Vladinova, Juan Enrique Gonzalez, College, School of Nursing & Health Studies
Using Mixed Reality to Simulate Airway Fires within the Nurse Anesthesia Curriculum
While uncommon, improper use of electrosurgery devices can cause devastating airway fires and injury injuries to both patients and operating room staff. Physicians and allied health personnel are therefore required to prevent and respond quickly and appropriately to incidents. ‘Airway Fire’ is a Magic Leap experience built to visualize combustion in intubated surgical patients who might be receiving a high oxygen concentration in the presence of electrocautery devices used by surgeons to operate. Smoke, fire, and water particles are rendered directly onto mannequins located within the School of Nursing and Health Studies' Simulation Hospital for faculty and students to use. This mixed reality application allows students to role play scenarios in preventing and responding to airway fires. This presentation will demonstrate the use of the Magic Leap experience with an airway mannequin, in the context of a discussion of the use of mixed reality within our program. Contributors to this project included: Nicole Gomez, DNP, CRNA, Linda Wunder, PhD, CRNA and Shayne Hauglum, PhD, CRNA.


1:00 - 1.15PM
Chris Chung, School of Architecture  
Spatial Computing In Architecture - A RAD Studio Based on the Magicverse Platform 
During the Spring 2019 semester, the School of Architecture launched its first studio course based on the Magicverse platform, led by Dean el-Khoury and co-taught by RAD Supervisor Christopher Chung, Amy DeDonato, Interaction Design Lead at Magic Leap and John Day, Technical Instructor at Magic Leap. Undergraduate and graduate students explored spatial and ubiquitous computing in their potential to change the ways we conceive, construct, inhabit and interact with our cities, buildings, and objects of everyday life. To envision how digital content would meaningfully enhance the physical environment, students engaged in research, design and prototyping of speculative ideas. This presentation will share our experience with using Magic Leap within architecture education, highlighting how the University of Miami’s campus served as a site for students to analyze and propose a design solution using spatial computation as a medium.


1:15 - 1.30PM
Diana Arboleda, College of Engineering
‘Vectors in Space’ - A Faculty-Student Collaboration to Visualize Vector Math using Magic Leap
This session will focus on sharing a work-in-progress from this year’s Faculty Learning Community on ‘Augmented Reality and Spatial Computing,’ being implemented within a current Fall 2019 course, Mechanics of Solids: Statics (CAE210). During the Spring and Summer 2019 semester, I partnered with with an undergraduate engineering student, Rachel de Paz, to prototype and visualize concepts including distributed forces and vector mathematics using a Magic Leap headset. Within Mechanics of Solids, or ‘Statics,’ students often struggle with core mathematical foundations around vector components so the first two weeks include a math refresher period, with a large portion spent on vectors. As students often experience difficulty visualizing vectors in 3D, ‘Vectors In Space’ was designed as a mixed reality application that allows the professor and students to draw and manipulate vectors in a real space. This presentation will share my experience in using the Magic Leap experience within a class, and my experience.

Speakers
avatar for Greta Valentinova Mitzova-Vladinova

Greta Valentinova Mitzova-Vladinova

Assistant Professor of Clinical, Associate Program Director of the Nurse Anesthesia Program, Nurse Anesthesia, School of Nursing and Health Studies
avatar for Juan Enrique Gonzalez

Juan Enrique Gonzalez

Professor of Clinical and Program Director of the BSN-DNP Nurse Anesthesia Program, Nurse Anesthesia, School of Nursing and Health Studies.
avatar for Chris Chung

Chris Chung

Lecturer and Supervisor, RAD-UM, School of Architecture
avatar for Diana Arboleda

Diana Arboleda

Lecturer, Structural Engineering and Director, Robotics in Education, Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering



Thursday October 17, 2019 12:45pm - 1:30pm EDT
West Ballroom Donna E. Shalala Student Center, 1330 Miller Drive, Coral Gables, FL, USA

1:45pm EDT

Your Conference, an Unsession
Have you ever observed that the best conversations at conferences take place in the hallways between sessions? Inspired by this observation, the Unsession - our adaptation of an un-conference - will feature an agenda entirely determined by showcase participants. Topics will be bounded only by the interests of the participants and can include themes such as teaching and learning challenges, trends and opportunities. Active participation is key, as attendees will be responsible for proposing and choosing topics, facilitating group discussions, and summarizing salient points for the broader group.




Thursday October 17, 2019 1:45pm - 2:30pm EDT
Main Ballroom

2:30pm EDT

Closing Remarks
Thursday October 17, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Main Ballroom